Thursday, July 31, 2014

Deep Breath promo pics


BBC America have released new promotional pictures from the first episode of Doctor Who Series 8, Deep Breath - click on the images included here for bigger versions. Featured in the pics are Peter Capaldi as The Doctor, Neve McIntosh as Madame Vastra and Jenna Coleman as Clara. The feature-length episode airs worldwide on television and in cinemas on Aug 23.


Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Moffat Talks Capaldi Costume

Current showrunner Steven Moffat has been chatting exclusively to SFX about Doctor Who and the outfit for Peter Capaldi's Doctor. Read what he has to say below.

“He wanted to be quite stark,” Moffat reveals. “Stark and skinny. A stick-insect sort of thing. Clara actually calls him a grey-haired stick-insect at one point. We had some hilarious pictures of Peter just dressing up. It was all coming from him because he’s really into his clothes. I didn’t feel qualified to go and chat too much about it. Certainly the costume didn’t go anywhere until I shut up. The thing I’ve learned about showrunning is you need to know the bits you’re bad at!

“I’ve got certain things that I’ll say – I don’t want anything in that costume that I have to write into the script. I don’t want people saying ‘But why are you dressed as a circus clown?’ I want him to walk into a pub, a restaurant, a space conference, an army base and nobody stares at him.

“There was an issue simply because it’s quite dark as a costume and it’s a show that largely takes place in a tunnel. I kept saying ‘We are going to be able to see him, aren’t we?’ I suppose the red lining helps, when the flaps are open.

“I think there’s always something a little bit formal about The Doctor. Oddly enough in this series, for whatever reason, he seems to be wearing different outfits far more often than The Doctor normally does. He’s got his basic outfit but he’s in a spacesuit in one of them, and he’s a caretaker in another one and then he’s all dressed up in a later episode. He does vary it a bit.  And he mixes up the basic costume, hugely. We’ve tended to see  the white shirt version in public but actually the one I like best is when he wears the jumper under his coat. I think he looks like a submarine commander, like an old sailor or something. It makes him all rugged and handsome!”


Read more from Steven Moffat in the new issue of SFX, on sale now with a choice of five exclusive collectable Doctor Who covers.


Capaldi gets EW cover!

The latest issue of the US magazine Entertainment Weekly, out Friday, has a very special Peter Capaldi cover and feature inside. Check out the deets below and click on the image included for a bigger version.

Does this week’s issue of Entertainment Weekly defy the laws of physics by being bigger on the inside than it would appear from looking at its exterior? Fans of the British science fiction show Doctor Who may well think so. For this week’s cover story, senior writer Clark Collis travels to the UK to meet with Peter Capaldi, the new star of the now 51-year-old time travel saga, and to find out what fans can expect from the forthcoming season of Doctor Who, which premieres on Aug 23.

“He’s more alien than we’ve seen him for a while,”
says the actor, speaking about his version of the eccentric Time Lord.
“He is less patient with the foibles of human beings.”

Thankfully, the whole Who team were patient with EW‘s probing about the new, hush-hush season. In addition to Capaldi, Collis also spoke with the actor’s costar Jenna Coleman and showrunner Steven Moffat who tackled such burning as questions as “Will Capaldi’s previous appearances in the Who universe be referenced this season?” and “What will happen in the two-part finale?” Collis even got to drive the Doctor’s bigger-on-the-inside time- and space-ship the TARDIS and did so without busting anything which, according to production designer Michael Pickwoad, makes him a more careful temporal navigator than previous Who star Matt Smith (“He was very good at breaking things”). We also persuade Capaldi to talk about the old monsters he’d like his Doctor to face and offer a sartorial breakdown of the Time Lord’s many looks through the show’s half-century history. Never seen Doctor Who (and feel a bid daunted by that history)? Then feel free to peruse our guide to how you can get into Who.

For more on Doctor Who, pick up a copy of this week’s Entertainment Weekly, on stands Friday.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Empire magazine feature

The latest issue of film magazine Empire has a special Doctor Who feature and exclusive photoshoot. Check out a snippet below, the magazine is on sale on this Thursday (July 31).

Showrunner Steven Moffat and his new star are promising to take the show into little darker realms, paring it down to its key essence and stripping it of frippery and flirting. "It can become a kind of franchise where it's not a real character at all", cautioned Capaldi, "but just an amalgam of elements that people think are Doctor Who: a scarf, a bow tie... I wanted to be the actual Doctor Who."

Elaborating on the kind of man this new Doctor will be, Capaldi stressed his enigmatic qualities:
"He's more alien than he's been for a while. He doesn't quite understand human beings or really care very much about their approval."
Jenna Coleman agreed:
"With Matt's Doctor [Clara] felt quite safe, really. She knew she'd be caught if she was in danger, but this guy is a lot less human-friendly and a lot less patient. He's more removed and inaccessible. You can't quite access him in the same way."
Cold fish or not, fans should feel in safe hands, because Capaldi has solid Whovian bona fides. "Doctor Who was a part of being a kid in the '60s with The Beatles and Sunday Night At The London Palladium and smog and bronchitis and all that stuff," he enthused in Empire. "I think it's part of my DNA."



For more from Peter Capaldi, Jenna Coleman and Steven Moffat pick up the September 2014 issue from Thursday July 31.

SOURCE

Monday, July 28, 2014

Doctor Who Symphonic Spectacular comes to Europe

Vision Nine and BBC Worldwide are delighted to announce the UK and European premiere of the hugely popular Doctor Who Symphonic Spectacular at six major city venues in May 2015.

The live show, which was a sell-out on its world premiere in Australia, will enjoy a limited run of twelve UK performances in London, Cardiff, Birmingham, Leeds, Newcastle and Glasgow.

It features over 100 performers and is conducted by Ben Foster, who conducts and orchestrates the musical scores for the TV series.  Music will be performed by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and members of the BBC National Chorus of Wales.


The show features a host of The Doctor’s famous adversaries including the iconic Daleks and Cybermen, the spine-chilling Silence and many more fan favourites. The live monsters provide a dramatic contrast to the evocative and thrilling music written by Murray Gold, who has been responsible for composing music for the series over the last eight years, including the record-breaking (and BAFTA award-winning) 50th anniversary episode, The Day of the Doctor.


The show will also feature Murray’s latest score and footage from the forthcoming Series 8, which will be broadcast around the world later this summer (starting August 23).

The live music will be accompanied by a big screen presentation of key moments and specially edited sequences from the past 50 years of Doctor Who. Tickets will go on general sale via the event and box office websites at 9am on Friday 1 August 2014, 2014, with prices starting at £20 per person – www.doctorwhosymphonicspectacular.com


Fans will discover the identity of the guest presenter for the UK shows in early 2015.

UK DATES & VENUES
SSE Arena, Wembley, London - May 23, 2015
Motorpoint Arena, Cardiff - May 25, 2015
National Indoor Arena, Birmingham - May 26, 2015
First Direct Arena, Leeds - May 27, 2015
Metro Radio Arena, Newcastle - May 28, 2015
SSE Hydro, Glasgow - May 29, 2015



The Doctor Who Symphonic Spectacular was first presented in Melbourne, Australia in February 2012, it went on to play a further nine sell-out performances at the Sydney Opera House in December 2012 receiving praise from the Australian media and fans alike. The Herald Sun called the show “Evocative and thrilling in equal measure” whilst the Sydney Morning Herald said: "The whole experience brought unalloyed pleasure that in some cases amounted to a religious rite”.

The show has continued to draw record figures in Australia and most recently thrilled over 34,000 fans across three cities in New Zealand.  


Tickets will go on general sale via the event and box office websites at 9am on Friday 1 August 2014, 2014, with prices starting at £20 per person – www.doctorwhosymphonicspectacular.com

Photos courtesy of Lucas Dawson and Joseph Byford

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Sunday, July 27, 2014

Peter Capaldi - The Sunday Times interview [UPDATE]

 

UK newspaper The Sunday Times has included a "Galactic Exclusive" - an interview with the new Doctor, Peter Capaldi and a special photoshoot. Check out the highlights of the piece below and click on the images included here for bigger versions.

UPDATE: Read the full interview at the bottom of this post.


On a romance with Clara: "There'll be no flirting, that's for sure. It's not what this Doctor is concerned with. It's quite a fun relationship but I did call and say, 'I want no Papa-Nicole moments.' There was a bit of tension with that at first, but I was absolutely adamant."
On The Doctor's costume: "I think it's quite a hard look. I always wanted him to be in black - I always just saw The Doctor in dark colours. Not tweed. Matt's a really young cool guy - he can wear anything, but I wanted to strip it back and be very stark."

On a costume that didn't make the grade: "The most ridiculous outfit, the one I loved, I looked like Count Arthur Strong with a real, old cardigan."


On the Cybermen, he says: "I'm trying to get the Mondasians back."

On the upcoming plots: "We still blow a lot of shit up. That's very important, but it's going to be a bit different from what we've seen over recent years. A bit more gravity. Some situations are a bit more sombre and I think there are more rooted dramatic scenes.... we have another level of drama, another tone. And the scenes are longer."

The interviewer also reveals that a special a signet ring has been constructed to hide Peter's own wedding ring.



The doctor will see you now
He’s going to be trickier, fiercer, madder. In his first interview as the new Doctor Who, Peter Capaldi talks to Matt Rudd about time travelling, saving galaxies and what he’ll be getting up to with his beautiful assistant.

Today, I have an appointment with The Doctor. It has been a year since Peter Capaldi was revealed as the Twelfth Time Lord and this is the first interview he’s given anywhere in the galaxy. Not only that, he has promised to put on his Doctor’s uniform — just for us.

In anticipation, I arrive a whole hour early. He arrives exactly on time, as time lords should, and just walks in. No TARDIS. No theme tune. Not even any dry ice. He is wearing a T-shirt and jeans, and his skin is so pale, it’s almost translucent. He’s hugging his ribs like he’s been fighting Daleks since January (which, technically, he has).

“Are you injured,” I ask, because it won’t do either of us or the BBC’s multimillion-pound franchise any good if he needs to regenerate before he’s even begun. “No, I’m just happy to be here,” he says. “Really relaxed.” He shakes my hand for as long as he appeared in the Christmas special (20 seconds), before floating off to the window to look out across sprawling St Mary’s cemetery. We have dragged him from his home in Crouch End, northeast London, to a studio in Kensal Green, northwest London, but, it transpires, this is where he first lived when he arrived in the capital as a penniless Glaswegian actor. His skin is translucent with wonderment. He’s hugging his ribs nostalgically.

So the first thing to note is that Capaldi is nothing like Malcolm Tucker, the spin doctor who first made him a household name turning the Whitehall air deep blue in The Thick of It. He is a will-o’-the wisp, gentle and soft-spoken, small for his 5ft 9in*, almost entirely non-sweary. And if he’s pleased to be hanging out in a remote part of London this morning, he’s absolutely beside himself with his new life as a Time Lord.

“When I was Doctor elect, before it was announced, I used to go to Forbidden Planet [a sci-fi superstore in the West End], and just hang around,” he volunteers. “It would amuse me that people wouldn’t know they were standing next to the next Doctor Who. That’s all past now. I can’t do it any more.”

"I did call and say, ‘I want no Papa-Nicole moments.’ I think there was a bit of tension with that at first, but I was absolutely adamant"

When I ask how it felt on his first day on set, his eyes mist up. “I had to step out of the TARDIS into a new world,” he says, fiddling with an uncooperative coffee percolator. “And because, obviously, in real life [spoiler alert] the TARDIS is not inside an actual police box, you’re just in this big cupboard. There are quite a few people in there, so you get quite cosy and there’s no fan or anything. But you have to be The Doctor. All the other stuff you put on the back burner, because it’ll just mess you up.” The percolator explodes, as percolators do — a time lord who can’t even pour his own coffee, he laughs to himself.

Being The Doctor (not making coffee) is a challenge for any actor, but for Capaldi it’s bigger because he is an aficionado. Make the mistake of asking him a simple Top Trumps question — are Daleks better than Cybermen? — and what feels like a whole morning can slip by on the answer. Because, you see, it depends whether you’re talking about the Mondasian Cybermen, which came from the planet Mondas, circa 1966, or those that arrived from a parallel universe in 2006.

“There is a conflict among fans,” Capaldi says gravely, “but I’m trying to get the Mondasians back.” Which doesn’t answer my question, but in case there are lots of different types of Dalek as well, I move on.

His earliest memories are of Daleks emerging from the water in The Dalek Invasion of Earth (1964), and it’s a bad idea to sully them with talk of toilet plungers and wobbly sets. “Everybody slags it off now,” he says, “but these programmes weren’t made to be viewed over and over again. When you just consumed them in that way, at the time, they were magical.”

Of course, back then, Daleks couldn’t go up stairs, so there was no need for Capaldi, age five, to hide behind the sofa in his third-floor tenement (his Italian father ran the ice-cream parlour on the ground floor). Instead, he built sets from shoe boxes, collected autographs — he ticked off three of the first four Doctors (William Hartnell was ill, so he got his wife’s autograph instead). He wrote fan mail to the producers; they sent back old scripts — “It was like being allowed inside the Magic Circle, the point I knew I wanted to be part of this world.”


His mother helped, sending him a Doctor Who annual every year. When I ask how long into adult life this continued, he starts laughing. Then he’s laughing so much that he starts struggling for air. Eventually, just at the point when I’m thinking I should call for help, he regains control: “By the time the show came back [in 2005], she must have thought I was too old. But I suspect it will start again now.”

Capaldi comes at a good time for the programme. Since its recommissioning after a 16-year hiatus, the Doctors have been regenerating into ever-younger lunchbox candy. Christopher Eccleston (41), David Tennant (34), then Matt Smith (28). With it, the plot lines, much to the chagrin of die-hard Whovians, have become more Twilight. There has been flirting and smooching. There has been a will-they, won’t-they dynamic between the Doctor and his sidekick, Clara. We were one nibble short of a hickey.

Following the age trajectory, the next Doctor would have been 23, and all would have been lost. Or, to be terribly 21st century, he could have been a she. Or Idris Elba — a favourite, although he may have been the unnamed black actor who turned down the role last time. Instead, the BBC went for a TV geriatric. Capaldi, 55 and counting, is joint oldest time lord with William Hartnell.

In the translucent flesh, he looks a good 30 years younger than Hartnell, thanks largely to the fact that he gave up alcohol years ago (and Hartnell liked a drink). But he’s still old enough that the BBC has a chiropractor on speed dial. More awkwardly, he’s old enough to be Clara’s father. This regeneration lark can have disturbing Freudian implications. So will the relationship with Clara, played by 28-year-old Jenna Coleman, continue to be romantic?

“There’ll be no flirting, that’s for sure,” he says. “It’s not what this Doctor’s concerned with. It’s quite a fun relationship, but no, I did call and say, ‘I want no Papa-Nicole moments.’ I think there was a bit of tension with that at first, but I was absolutely adamant.”

What will there be, then? Is the 12th Doctor an old codger like Hartnell? Will he be a more modern fiftysomething, a time lord who can work an iPad? Executive producer Steven Moffat has said he’ll be older, trickier, fiercer. Mark Gatiss, the best writer on the show, says the new doctor “has a madness in his eyes”.

“All that’s true,” says Capaldi, “but he’s also joyful. One thing the show does well is balance the epic and the domestic. You can go from the edge of the universe to a pedestrian precinct. This Doctor loves watching stars being born in Andromeda; he’s also thrilled to see litter blowing across the supermarket car park at dawn.”

So who has he based his mad-eyed, fierce, joyful litter-watcher on? It was widely assumed that his Malcolm Tucker had been forged in the same fires as Alastair Campbell, but Capaldi later revealed the inspiration came from Hollywood’s “malevolent forces in Armani suits”. So what about the Doctor? “There was a large selection of people,” he says. “I won’t name names, because it’s more fun for people to spot them. I have a book, though. I started to collect images and quotes from people I thought were Doctor Who-ish. They might have a turn of phrase or a certain look that works… so I brought these things together.”

The book is kept under lock and key. After the first five scripts of the new series were inadvertently leaked at the start of the month, he’s not taking any chances.


 Photography by Paul Stuart 


* Blogtor's note - pretty sure Capaldi is 6 feet.

Saturday, July 26, 2014

New Teaser - "Listen!"


The BBC have released a new teaser trailer for Doctor Who Series 8 - watch it in the player above. Deep Breath, the first episode from the Peter Capaldi era, airs worldwide on August 23 whilst its global premiere takes place in Cardiff on Aug 7. The feature-length story will also be screened in cinemas - details HERE.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Deep Breath cinema screenings


The BBC have announced today that the premiere episode of Doctor Who Series 8 will receive theatrical screenings across the world. Deep Breath, featuring Peter Capaldi as The Doctor, will be shown in cinemas from August 23. Check out the details below.

Doctor Who makes a spectacular return to the big screen in the feature-length premiere episode of Series 8; Deep Breath. Directed by acclaimed Director Ben Wheatley (Sightseers, A Field in England) and written by Lead Writer and Executive Producer Steven Moffat, the beginning of the Twelfth Doctor’s era stars Peter Capaldi as the Doctor, Jenna Coleman as his companion Clara Oswald and sees the return of fan favourites The Paternoster Gang - Madame Vastra (Neve McIntosh), Jenny Flint (Catrin Stewart) and Strax (Dan Starkey) – in a pulse-racing adventure through Victorian London.

Steven Moffat comments: "Last November the Doctor didn't just conquer the world on television, he did it in the cinemas too. And like the show-off he is, he can't resist another go - one taste of the silver screen is never enough. On August 23rd the new Doctor will begin his new adventures on BBC One and in cinemas all over the world. Movie-land beware - Capaldi is coming to get you!"

Deep Breath will be screened in participating cinemas around the world from 23 August, 2014. More information will be released by BBC Worldwide and participating cinema chains over the coming weeks. For all of the latest information please visit doctorwho.tv/watch/cinema. For information on all Doctor Who events and products visit doctorwho.tv and sign up for the newsletter.

Please note: Not all participating cinemas will be airing the episode on Aug 23 and in North America fans will be able to attend encore screenings on Aug 25. 

Deep Breath receives its worldwide premiere in Cardiff on Aug 7, details HERE.

Thanks to BBC Worldwide

AUDIO REVIEW: The Abandoned

The Abandoned
by Nigel Fairs and Louise Jameson

Starring Tom Baker and Louise Jameson

Out Now


The Point of Stillness. A place the Time Lords are forbidden to go. Deep within the TARDIS, something unusual is happening. One of the ship's oldest secrets is about to be revealed, someone long-forgotten is ready to reappear.

This is a particularly fantastic story and certainly the highlight of the largely consistent third season of Fourth Doctor adventures. Massive kudos to Louise Jameson and co-writer Nigel Fairs for a memorable outing. We know that it was the TARDIS that stole the Doctor; we know Clara recommended that The Doctor take the particular one he did; and, thanks to Big Finish, we even know who was fixing the ship when it was stolen; but to whom did the TARDIS actually, originally belong? That question is answered in this wonderful and imaginative adventure.

Not only is this long unanswered question resolved, but there are also some particularly inspired ideas on offer. Without giving too much away Jameson and Fairs have personified imagination as embodied characters. This fantastic innovation reminds one of wonderfully well developed concept stories featuring the Mara from the Peter Davison era.

I would be very interested to see how much of the writing was handled by Louise and how much by Nigel. From the interviews included with the release it certainly seems the ideas were Jameson’s and and the pair equally shared the writing of the piece.

Stephanie Cole, a co-star of Jameson's in the memorable BBC series Tenko, is fantastic as Marianna, and the assembled Mandi Symonds, Andy Snowball and co-writer Nigel Fairs himself make an excellent ensemble. Both Tom Baker and Louise seem very invested in this adventure and are really buzzing as a team.

This one comes very highly recommended. Louise Jameson co-wrote it, it adds a great new part of the Who mythology and it has some very out of the box thinking and ideas. Please do give it a listen.

BLOGTOR RATING 9/10
Thanks to Big Finish